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Two pedestrian crossings proposed for A96 in Elgin at Dr Gray’s Roundabout and South College Street14 Sep 2017

Two traffic signal controlled crossings are proposed to be installed in Elgin on the A96 at Dr. Gray’s Roundabout on West Road and at South College Street.

Here you will find information on how the crossings came about, their benefits and detailed plans.

The A96 is the trunk road maintained by BEAR Scotland Ltd on behalf of the Trunk Roads Authority, Transport Scotland. The local road network is maintained by Moray Council.

 

Why and how we have considered the crossings?

We received frequent communication over a number of years from various members of the public and local groups, staff at East End Primary School, the school crossing patroller at South College Street and Elgin Academy Parent Council to investigate the possibility of installing traffic signal controlled crossings in Elgin.

These individuals and groups were concerned about the day to day safety of school pupils and members of the public being able to cross the A96 in safety. The school crossing patroller at South College Street reported numerous incidents of ‘near misses’ with vehicles failing to stop for the crossing patrol.

We undertook an investigation looking at three locations including Dr. Gray’s Roundabout, South College Street and also near Northfield Roundabout. The investigation included the following:

Analysis of the accident history of the three locations.

Pedestrian and traffic surveys were undertaken to identify the numbers of pedestrians crossing the A96 and the volumes of traffic on the road.

Three locations were assessed for suitability of a crossing point over the A96. The investigation included an assessment of the existing pedestrian crossing infrastructure and the level of conflict experienced between pedestrians and vehicles.

The numbers of children, elderly and disabled road users was assessed as part of the pedestrian survey. Key locations such as hospitals, public buildings, commercial centres and schools and colleges were reviewed to identify generators of pedestrian movements.

The proximity of cycle and walking routes to the proposed crossings was identified. In particular, the potential for providing future cycle routes to the proposed crossing points was explored. 

The assessment procedure for providing traffic signal controlled crossings is defined in Local Transport Note 1/95 published by the Department for Transport. This guidance was followed when determining the suitability and appropriateness of potential crossing points. The assessment undertaken recommended installation of traffic signal controlled crossings at Dr. Gray’s roundabout and South College Street but not near Northfield Roundabout.

See below link at bottom of page for plans, maps and drawings of the proposed A96 Elgin Crossings.

 

Benefits of the crossings

High levels of potential conflict between pedestrians and vehicles were found, particularly at peak times. A traffic signal controlled crossing will increase the safety for pedestrians crossing the A96 at these locations.

Due to the closely located cycle routes situated on the northern side of Elgin there is a real opportunity to incorporate the signal controlled crossings into future cycle routes in the town.

The proposed crossings will be ready to upgrade to ‘Toucan’ style crossings which would enable cyclists to use them.

By improving the provision of crossing facilities on the A96 this will help to reduce community severance and encourage modal shift by making walking and cycling a more attractive option. This could have a potential health benefit and potentially reduce the levels of car usage in Elgin.

 

The crossings in the wider context of Elgin

There are three existing traffic signal controlled crossings within the main town centre area of Elgin. These are situated close to Tesco supermarket, near the town bus station and a further crossing at Lossie Wynd. Two segregated crossing points are provided by a pedestrian subway near St. Giles Shopping Centre and a pedestrian over-bridge on Alexandra Road.

The two new planned crossings are situated away from these existing facilities and therefore add to the towns facilities rather than duplicating them.

The new crossing points will be ‘on-demand’ and will therefore only be activated and a ‘red’ stop signal be shown to traffic when a user presses the call button. At all other times the signals will show as ‘green’ allowing traffic to flow freely. This will minimise any unnecessary delays to traffic.

At the location of the South College Street crossing, a school crossing patrol operates. The traffic signal controlled crossing will therefore formalise this crossing location and result in less disruption to traffic.

At Dr Gray’s Roundabout the pedestrian and cycle surveys showed that these crossing movements were highest between 3pm and 4pm. At South College Street the numbers of pedestrians and cyclist was highest during the period 8am to 9am; and, We recognise that there is likely to be additional delay to drivers on the A96 and this has been carefully considered against the safety benefits for pedestrians and cyclists. At the South College Street crossing there are very high numbers of school pupils and at the Dr’ Gray’s roundabout there are also high numbers of school pupils but also a large volume of adult users, many of which are travelling to and from the hospital.

See below link at bottom of page for plans, maps and drawings of the proposed A96 Elgin Crossings.

 

Next Steps - Construction

It is proposed that the two traffic signal controlled crossings will be installed in the autumn/winter period of 2017/2018.

Works will be undertaken during off-peak periods, i.e. 9.30am-3pm to minimise disruption to traffic and the travelling public. Some elements of the works may require weekend working with diversions put in place.

We’ve already hosted a public information exhibition in Elgin Town Hall to discuss the project with members of the community, and initial feedback about the proposals has been very positive.  

Letters will be distributed to those in the immediate vicinity of the works before construction starts, detailing how the crossings will be installed and when works will take place. Information will be provided on social media feeds including the BEAR Scotland website and Twitter.

To assess the safe operation of the crossings when constructed, a Road Safety Audit has also been undertaken for the proposed crossings. The Road Safety Audit reviews the proposed scheme design to ensure safe operation by all road user groups.

See below link at bottom of page for plans, maps and drawings of the proposed A96 Elgin Crossings.

 

How you can find out more

Follow us on Twitter @NETrunkRoads for latest updates regarding the scheme and any trunk road traffic issues.

If you have specific comments in relation to this scheme then please e-mail them to NEConsultation@bearscotland.co.uk

BEAR Scotland are appointed by Transport Scotland to manage and maintain the North East Scotland Trunk Road Network.

downloadBEAR Scotland A96 Elgin Pedestrian Crossings - Location maps and plans.pdf

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New proposals for A828 road improvements following community feedback29 Aug 2017

New proposals for A828 road improvements following community feedback

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New proposals for A828 road improvements following community feedback29 Aug 2017

Road to remain open during £270,000 of road improvements for A828 in September

 

BEAR Scotland has revised a programme of improvements for the A828 following feedback from a public consultation into proposals.

The programme of work, worth over £270,000, will allow for four road improvement projects to be completed on the A828 totalling to just over a kilometre of the route, without closing the road.  The upgrades will target areas of the road in need of repair and will create a smoother and safer journey for motorists.

The new programme will be carried out from Monday 18 September over six days at different sections of the route.  The road will remain open throughout the improvements however a 10mph convoy system will remain in place for light vehicles only to ensure the safety of roadworkers as well as motorists.  HGV diversions via the A82 and A85 will be in place during the day, and further notification has been carried out with the Road Haulage Association and hauliers to inform them of the plans.  No working will take place at the weekends to further limit disruption.  

The six-day programme of work is a reduced version of a larger A828 improvement project which was consulted on earlier in August.  The public consultation, which involved a postal campaign to over 2,000 addresses, invited community feedback on proposals to carry out over £700,000 of improvements across 14 different schemes on the A828 trunk road.  The original plans required up to ten day-time closures of sections of the road in order to carry out the project safely and also due to the restrictions which apply to accessing surfacing materials from quarries at night-time. 

After reviewing all feedback from over 100 responses, a new reduced programme of improvements has been prepared which will see four of the original 14 projects carried out, with a further six projects to be phased throughout the remainder of the current financial year.  The four larger resurfacing schemes requiring road closures have been postponed and with the aim of reprogramming under multiple night-time road closures in the future.  In the meantime, these sites will receive further localised patch repairs in an effort to slow their deterioration over the coming winter period.

Commenting on the new programme of work for the A828, Eddie Ross, BEAR Scotland’s North West Representative said: “We wanted to gauge the feedback from the public on our original proposals for improving the A828, and we welcomed the large number of responses.

“These responses indicated that while the need for road maintenance and improvements in the area was understood, day-time road closures would not be an acceptable method of working, particularly during September.

“We listened to this feedback and have instead produced a scaled-back version of the programme to ensure that the A828 remains in a safe working condition.  There are four resurfacing schemes which we cannot carry out without closing the road for safety reasons, so we will instead look to re-programme these at a later date under night-time closures when agreement for the delivery of surfacing materials from quarries can be obtained. 

“We endeavour to keep traffic disruption to a minimum while keeping the road as safe as possible for motorists and our teams, and we thank all those who reached out to BEAR during the consultation for the project and will be contacting them to share our updated programme.”

The new programme will get underway from Monday 18 September.

Real time journey information is available from Traffic Scotland on www.trafficscotland.org or twitter @TrafficScotland.

 

Programme of work is scheduled to take place as follows:

Monday 18 September – Kentallen – 10mph convoy with HGV restriction, 8am to 7pm

Tuesday 19 September – Duror – 10mph convoy with HGV restriction, 8am to 7pm

Wednesday 20 September to Friday 22 September – Appin – 10mph convoy with HGV restriction, 8am to 7pm

Monday 25 Septmeber – Ledaig – 10mph convoy with HGV restriction, 8.30am to 7pm

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Milestone reached as temporary bridge on A830 opens29 Aug 2017

Milestone reached as temporary bridge on A830 opens

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Milestone reached as temporary bridge on A830 opens29 Aug 2017

£10M bridges replacement programme continues at Criche Bridge

 

The first milestone has been reached during the most recent bridge improvement project on the A830 with the opening of a new temporary bridge to traffic at Criche.

The £10M bridges replacement programme will see a total of seven bridges replaced along the ‘Road to the Isles’, one of Scotland’s most scenic routes.  

Criche Bridge, approximately seven miles west of Glenfinnan, is the latest bridge to be replaced. The project is progressing well with the completion of the temporary road bridge ensuring that the A830 remains open to motorists during construction.

Criche is the sixth bridge to be replaced on the A830, with the first at Dearg opened to traffic in December 2014, two at Garbh and Utha completed in 2015 and a further two at Ranochan and Arieniskill completed in 2016. Design is underway for the next bridge replacement at Shlatach, with construction due on-site next year. 

The new bridges are wider than the old structures, and the designs have incorporated stone from the old bridges to help the new structure blend in with their rural Highland surroundings.  

Construction of the new bridges has had to commence during the summer due to environmental restrictions around the sensitive watercourses, with each structure expected to take up to six months to complete.  

Eddie Ross, BEAR Scotland’s North West Representative said: “We are delighted that the scheme at Criche Bridge is progressing well, and the installation of the temporary bridge is an important step that will help ensure that any disruption to motorists is kept to a minimum.

“The £10M investment in to the replacement of seven bridges plus improvements at two others on the route will help ensure that the scenic “Road to The Isles” is kept to a safe standard for years to come.

“We thank motorists for their continued patience while we carry out the bridge upgrades, and, as with the previous five bridge replacement schemes, we urge them to take care and adhere to any traffic management that is in place for their safety.”

Real time journey information is available from Traffic Scotland at www.trafficscotland.org or twitter @trafficscotland.

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North East Connections - Summer 201707 Jul 2017

Read about the latest news from the North East Unit

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North East Connections - Summer 201707 Jul 2017

Our latest North East Connections newsletter is now out!

Read about the latest news from the North East Unit, including our summary of the past winter, our latest investments in the trunk roads and some of our work in the community.

Click here to read the newsletter, or download it via the link below!

 

downloadBEAR Scotland - North East Connections Stakeholder Newselter - Summer 2017.pdf

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BEAR Scotland celebrates International Women in Engineering Day23 Jun 2017

BEAR Scotland takes part in International Women in Engineering Day

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BEAR Scotland celebrates International Women in Engineering Day23 Jun 2017

 

BEAR Scotland manages and maintains over 2000km of trunk roads including over 3000 structures in the north of Scotland.  Our team of engineers work hard to deliver road and bridge maintenance schemes in order to keep the network safe and moving.  

We’re proud to be taking part in International Women in Engineering Day on Friday 23 June to raise the profile and celebrate the achievements of women in engineering and encourage more girls to consider engineering as a career.  We caught up with some of the women in engineering within BEAR Scotland to find out what inspired them to get into engineering, the highlights of their career and the best bits about their role.   

Meet some of the women in engineering within our team:

 

Lilia Bliatsiou

Assistant Bridge Engineer

Lilia graduated with a BSc in Civil Engineering from South Wales University in 2011. Since then she has had a career spanning multiple countries including working at her university’s laboratories in south Wales, followed by three years working in a Roads and Structures team in Greece before joining BEAR Scotland’s Bridges team in 2014.  She is now part of a team responsible for over 2,400 structures in North West Scotland, and completed BEAR’s ICE Graduate Programme in May. 

 

Why engineering, and who inspired you?

Engineering is the best job I could think of when I was applying for universities. You can see your ideas and designs materialise and you can be a part of the whole process from conceptual design to the actual construction. 

Best thing about your job with BEAR:

Being a part of the Bridges team, working on my designs in the office and also being able to go on site for surveys, site supervisions and inspections of structures.

Career highlight: 

Completing BEAR’s ICE Graduate Programme in May this year.

What does it mean to be a woman in engineering?:

An engineer is not defined by gender but by their ability to think critically and solve problems effectively - I think it is just that societal expectations contribute to less women being involved in engineering.

 

 

Amie Matthews

Graduate Engineer

Amie graduated from the University of Dundee in 2014 before working as a CAD Technician and designer for a precast concrete products manufacturing company in Edinburgh for a year and a half, designing concrete flooring and stairs for hotels and flats.  Amie joined BEAR Scotland’s Minor Improvements and Traffic and Road Safety team in 2016 and is currently working on schemes to improve the safety of the trunk road network, and is part of BEAR’s ICE Graduate scheme.

 

Why engineering, and who inspired you?

I always enjoyed school work where it involved designing something, I didn’t mind what it was that I was designing - I just really enjoyed the process and the problem solving. I chose civil engineering because my dad was a civil engineer and inspired me with interesting stories about design problems and how he overcame them.

Best thing about your job with BEAR:

Carrying out accident investigation and prevention studies. It is a very rewarding task as the recommendations I make in the study directly influence the safety of Scotland’s trunk roads.

Career highlight: 

I have only been with BEAR for a year so I have not undertaken any large schemes as of yet, but the general highlight is seeing my design get constructed.

What does it mean to be a woman in engineering?:

It’s just like being a man in engineering...except you happen to be female!

 

 

Julie Lee

Road Maintenance Scheme Designer

Julie has worked for BEAR Scotland for four years since leaving school, starting first as a Roads Inspector for the company before progressing to a Category 2 Designer which involves designing road maintenance schemes and repairs.  Julie is also currently studying towards her HND in Civil Engineering at Dundee and Angus College.

 

Why engineering, and who inspired you?

I knew I wanted to have a career in engineering since I was at school, one of my technology teachers influenced me and encouraged me to go for it.

Best thing about your job with BEAR:

I get the opportunity to design small schemes to help and improve the trunk road network in the north west of Scotland.

Career highlight: 

When BEAR gave me the opportunity to study Civil Engineering which led to me furthering my career within the company.

What does it mean to be a woman in engineering?

I think it’s great and women should not be put off by the fact that there are more men within the industry.

 

 

Kristen Milne

Road Maintenance Scheme Coordinator

Kristen is BEAR Scotland’s coordinator for all road maintenance schemes and repairs in the north west of Scotland that are classed as category 1 or 2 projects.  She leads a team of designers who work on engineering projects which can vary significantly in size and nature, allowing plenty of opportunity to expand her expertise in the field. These projects are vital in ensuring the safety of the trunk road network in Scotland.

 

Why engineering, and who inspired you?

I have been involved in the engineering sector for most of my working career.  When an opportunity arose to have an active role in BEAR Scotland’s design office, I took it.  

Best thing about your job with BEAR:

No one day is the same in my role as the unpredictable nature of the Scottish weather can have a dramatic effect on the day to day work. In spite of the challenges of working in such a reactive role, working with good colleagues and different teams across the company makes the role enjoyable. 

Career highlight: 

Progressing from a scheme Designer to Coordinator of road maintenance schemes at BEAR.

What does it mean to be a woman in engineering?

I’m part of an industry which is both challenging and empowering all at the same time, and I hope more women get involved.

 

 

Marta Ibanez

Environmental Advisor

Marta works as part of the Environmental team at BEAR Scotland, a core team that helps ensure all of BEAR’s work is environmentally friendly and sustainable. Before joining BEAR two years ago, Marta worked for two years with two leading logistics companies in Spain implementing Environmental Management Systems.

 

Why engineering, and who inspired you?

My background is in Environmental Sciences, so although I did not study engineering I’ve chosen to work in the civil engineering field to influence engineers regarding environmental protection.  My biggest inspiration behind my career choice was my mother. She always encouraged me to leave my mark and change the environment for the better and challenge others around me to do the same. 

Best thing about your job with BEAR:

Working with colleagues with diverse backgrounds, nationalities and interests.

Career highlight: 

Attaining my Associate professional qualification from the Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment (IEMA).

What does it mean to be a woman in engineering?

It means the same as being a woman in any other field. In every field however women are still getting paid less than men, fulfil less management positions and have to fight several barriers - and this is something which needs to be talked about and addressed.

 

 

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BEAR Scotland North West Unit – List of Significant Works Planned May 2017 to July 201705 Jun 2017

BEAR Scotland North West Unit – List of Works Significant Works Planned May 2017 to July 2017

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BEAR Scotland North West Unit – List of Significant Works Planned May 2017 to July 201705 Jun 2017

BEAR Scotland North West Unit – List of Works Significant Works Planned May 2017 to July 2017

Availabe to download below is a list of some of the major work planned by BEAR Scotland in the North West over the next three months.

Please note the following:

This is not an exhaustive list and other works may be added to the programme.

All dates are indicative and are subject to change.

For road closures, consultation is carried out with relevant parties. Following this consultation the dates of works and type of traffic management used may be changed.

Real time journey information is available from Traffic Scotland www.trafficscotland.org or twitter @trafficscotland.  

 

downloadBEAR Scotland North West Planned works May 2017 - July 2017.pdf

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